/What Coronavirus Means for the Future of Work

What Coronavirus Means for the Future of Work

With states in varying degrees of lockdown and social distancing strongly urged, many businesses are letting employees work from home during the coronavirus pandemic.

While employers worry about productivity, companies, on average, save thousands per telecommuter. That reality, coupled with the uncertainty of this pandemic, could change what the typical workday looks like for millions of Americans. (CNBC)

With the U.S. government declaring a state of emergency due to the coronavirus, companies are enabling work-from-home structures to keep business running and help employees follow social distancing guidelines. However, working remotely has been on the rise for a while.

“The coronavirus is going to be a tipping point. We plodded along at about 10% growth a year for the last 10 years, but I foresee that this is going to really accelerate the trend,” Kate Lister, president of Global Workplace Analytics, told CNBC.

Gallup’s State of the American Workplace 2017 study found that 43% of employees work remotely with some frequency. Research indicates that in a five-day workweek, working remotely for two to three days is the most productive. That gives the employee two to three days of meetings, collaboration and interaction, with the opportunity to just focus on the work for the other half of the week.

Remote work seems like a logical precaution for many companies that employ people in the digital economy. However, not all Americans have access to the internet at home, and many work in industries that require in-person work.